afford
\ \ [OE] This verb originally meant ‘accomplish, fulfil’. In Old English times it was geforthian, formed from the prefix ge-, denoting completion of an action, and forthianadvance towards completion’ or literally ‘further’ (from the adverb forth). The notion of accomplishing something or managing something gradually led, by the 15th century, to the idea of being able to do something because one has enough money.
\ \ Meanwhile, the original ge- prefix, which by Middle English times had become i- (iforthien), had been transformed into af- under the influence of the many Latin-based words beginning in aff-, and in the 16th century spellings with final d in place of th start to appear.
\ \ Cf.FORTH

Word origins - 2ed. . 2005.

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  • Afford — Af*ford ([a^]f*f[=o]rd ), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Afforded}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Affording}.] [OE. aforthen, AS. gefor[eth]ian, for[eth]ian, to further, accomplish, afford, fr. for[eth] forth, forward. The prefix ge has no well defined sense. See… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • afford — [ə fôrd′] vt. [ME aforthen < OE geforthian, to advance < forthian, to further] 1. to have enough or the means for; bear the cost of without serious inconvenience: used with can or be able [I m not able to afford a car; can you afford the… …   English World dictionary

  • afford — UK US /əˈfɔːd/ verb [T] ● can afford Cf. can afford …   Financial and business terms

  • afford — (v.) O.E. geforðian to put forth, contribute; further, advance; carry out, accomplish, from ge completive prefix (see A (Cf. a ) (1)) + forðian to further, from forð forward, onward (see FORTH (Cf. forth)). Change of th to d took place late 16c.… …   Etymology dictionary

  • afford — [v1] able to have or do; within financial means allow, be able to, bear, be disposed to, have enough for, have the means for, incur, manage, spare, stand, support, sustain; concepts 335,713 afford [v2] give, produce bestow, furnish, grant, impart …   New thesaurus

  • afford — ► VERB 1) (can/could afford) have sufficient money, time, or means for. 2) provide (an opportunity or facility). DERIVATIVES affordability noun affordable adjective. ORIGIN Old English, «promote, perform»; related to FORTH(Cf. ↑ …   English terms dictionary

  • afford — index administer (tender), allow (endure), bear (yieid), bequeath, bestow, contribute (supply) …   Law dictionary

  • afford — *give, confer, bestow, present, donate Analogous words: *offer, proffer: *furnish: *grant, accord Antonyms: deny (something one wants, asks, hopes for) pm4]Contrasted words: withhold, hold, hold back (see KEEP): refuse, * …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • afford */*/*/ — UK [əˈfɔː(r)d] / US [əˈfɔrd] verb [transitive] Word forms afford : present tense I/you/we/they afford he/she/it affords present participle affording past tense afforded past participle afforded Get it right: afford: Afford is never followed by a… …   English dictionary

  • afford — v. 1) to well afford 2) (formal) (A) it afforded great pleasure to him; or: it afforded him great pleasure 3)(E; preceded by the forms: can cannot can t could) we cannot afford to buy a new house; we can ill afford to lose this contract 4)… …   Combinatory dictionary

  • afford — af|ford W3S1 [əˈfo:d US o:rd] v [T] [: Old English; Origin: geforthian to carry out , from forth] 1.) can/could afford [usually negative] a) to have enough money to buy or pay for something afford [to do] sth ▪ We can t afford to go on vacation… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

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