accumulate
\ \ [16] Accumulate was borrowed from Latin accumulāre, a compound verb formed from the prefix ad-, here meaning ‘in addition’, and cumulāreheap up’ (the source of English cumulative). Cumulāre itself derived from cumulusheap’; English adopted this with its original Latin meaning in the 17th century, but it was not until the early 19th century that it was applied (by the meteorologist Luke Howard) to mountainous billowing cloud formations.
\ \ Cf.CUMULATIVE, CUMULUS

Word origins - 2ed. . 2005.

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  • accumulate — ac·cu·mu·late vb lat·ed, lat·ing vt: to gather esp. little by little; specif: to add (income from a fund) back into the principal vi: to increase gradually in amount or number Merriam Webster’s Dictionary of Law. Merriam Webster. 1996 …   Law dictionary

  • accumulate — accumulate, amass, hoard imply in both literal and figurative usage a bringing together so as to make a store or great quantity. Accumulate implies a piling up by a series of increases rather than by a single complete act; it is applicable to… …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • Accumulate — Ac*cu mu*late, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Accumulated}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Accumulating}.] [L. accumulatus, p. p. of accumulare; ad + cumulare to heap. See {Cumulate}.] To heap up in a mass; to pile up; to collect or bring together; to amass; as, to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Accumulate — Ac*cu mu*late ([a^]k*k[=u] m[ u]*l[=a]t), v. i. To grow or increase in quantity or number; to increase greatly. [1913 Webster] Ill fares the land, to hastening ills a prey, Where wealth accumulates, and men decay. Goldsmith. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Accumulate — Ac*cu mu*late ( l[asl]t), a. [L. accumulatus, p. p. of accumulare.] Collected; accumulated. Bacon. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • accumulate — (v.) 1520s, from L. accumulatus, pp. of accumulare to heap up (see ACCUMULATION (Cf. accumulation)); Related: ACCUMULATED (Cf. Accumulated); accumulating …   Etymology dictionary

  • accumulate — [v] gather or amass something accrue, acquire, add to, agglomerate, aggregate, amalgamate, assemble, bring together, cache, clean up*, collect, collocate, compile, concentrate, cumulate, draw together, expand, gain, gather, grow, heap, heap… …   New thesaurus

  • accumulate — ► VERB 1) gather together a number or quantity of. 2) gather or build up. DERIVATIVES accumulation noun accumulative adjective. ORIGIN Latin accumulare heap up , from cumulus a heap …   English terms dictionary

  • accumulate — [ə kyo͞om′yo͞o lāt΄, ə kyo͞om′yəlāt΄] vt., vi. accumulated, accumulating [< L accumulatus, pp. of accumulare < ad , to + cumulare, to heap: see CUMULUS] to pile up, collect, or gather together, esp. over a period of time accumulable [ə… …   English World dictionary

  • accumulate — 01. Emmanuel was able to [accumulate] a certain amount of English vocabulary working with a British family in France. 02. My wife keeps going to garage sales, and has [accumulated] a lot of worthless junk that she considers to be a real bargain.… …   Grammatical examples in English

  • accumulate — verb ADVERB ▪ gradually, slowly ▪ steadily ▪ quickly, rapidly VERB + ACCUMULATE ▪ begin to …   Collocations dictionary

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