acoustic
\ \ [17] Appropriately enough, acoustic may be distantly related to hear. It first appeared in English in Francis Bacon’s Advancement of Learning 1605, borrowed from Greek akoustikós. This in turn was derived from the Greek verb for ‘hear’, akoúein, which, it has been speculated, may have some connection with *khauzjan, the original Germanic source of English hear, not to mention German hören and Dutch horen (as well as with Latin cavērebe on one’s guard’, and hence with English caution and caveat).
\ \ Cf.CAUTION, CAVEAT, HEAR

Word origins - 2ed. . 2005.

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  • Acoustic — A*cous tic (#; 277), a. [F. acoustique, Gr. ? relating to hearing, fr. ? to hear.] Pertaining to the sense of hearing, the organs of hearing, or the science of sounds; auditory. [1913 Webster] {Acoustic duct}, the auditory duct, or external… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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  • acoustic — (adj.) c.1600, from Fr. acoustique, from Gk. akoustikos pertaining to hearing, from akoustos heard, audible, verbal adjective from akouein to hear, probably from copulative prefix a + koein to mark, perceive, hear, from PIE *kous to hear, perhaps …   Etymology dictionary

  • acoustic — 1. Earlier in the 20c two pronunciations were competing with each other: one with ow and the other with oo . The second has prevailed, despite Fowler s prediction that ‘if the word came into popular use, it would probably be with ow ’, based on… …   Modern English usage

  • Acoustic — A*cous tic, n. A medicine or agent to assist hearing. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • acoustic — acoustic, acoustical *auditory …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • acoustic — [adj] sound audile, audio, auditory, aural, hearing, phonic; concepts 591,594 …   New thesaurus

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