coarse

\ \ [14] For such an everyday word, the origins of coarse are surprisingly clouded. It first appears in the forms corse or course, and meaning ‘ordinary, everyday’, which has led to speculation that it is an application of the noun course, in the sense ‘the ordinary run of things, the usual practice’; however, not all etymologists accept this. The modern spelling coarse became established in the 18th century.

Word origins - 2ed. . 2005.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • coarse´ly — coarse «krs, kohrs», adjective, coars|er, coars|est. 1. made up of fairly large parts; not fine: »coarse salt, coarse sand. 2. heavy or rough in looks or texture: »Burlap is a coarse cloth. The old fisherman had coarse, weathered features. 3.… …   Useful english dictionary

  • Coarse — (k[=o]rs), a. [Compar. {Coarser} (k[=o]rs [ e]r); superl. {Coarsest}.] [As this word was anciently written course, or cours, it may be an abbreviation of of course, in the common manner of proceeding, common, and hence, homely, made for common… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • coarse — [kôrs] adj. coarser, coarsest [specialized var. of COURSE in sense of “ordinary or usual order” as in of course] 1. of inferior or poor quality; common [coarse fare] 2. consisting of rather large elements or particles [coarse sand] 3. not fine or …   English World dictionary

  • coarse — coarse, vulgar, gross, obscene, ribald are comparable when applied to persons, their language, or behavior and mean offensive to a person of good taste or moral principles. Coarse is opposed to fine not only with reference to material things (as… …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • coarse — [ko:s US ko:rs] adj [Date: 1300 1400; Origin: Probably from course (ordinary) way (of things) ] 1.) having a rough surface that feels slightly hard = ↑rough ≠ ↑smooth ▪ a jacket of coarse wool 2.) consisting of threads or parts that are thick or… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • coarse — [ kɔrs ] adjective * 1. ) feeling rough and hard: a jacket made from coarse gray cloth the coarse outer leaves of the cabbage 2. ) consisting of large or thick pieces: coarse sand 3. ) rude and offensive: They objected to his coarse language …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • coarse — kō(ə)rs, kȯ(ə)rs adj 1) visible to the naked eye or by means of a compound microscope <coarse particles> 2) of a tremor of wide excursion <a coarse tremor of the extremities> 3) harsh, raucous, or rough in tone used of some sounds… …   Medical dictionary

  • coarse — coarse; coarse·ness; …   English syllables

  • coarse — [adj1] not fine, rude base, bawdy, blue*, boorish, brutish, cheap, common, crass, crude, dirty, earthy, filthy, foul, foul mouthed, gross, gruff, immodest, impolite, improper, impure, incult, indelicate, inelegant, loutish, low, lowbred, lowdown… …   New thesaurus

  • coarse — index blatant (obtrusive), brutal, disreputable, impertinent (insolent), inelegant, lascivious, lur …   Law dictionary

  • coarse — early 15c., cors ordinary (modern spelling is from late 16c.), probably adj. use of noun cours (see COURSE (Cf. course)), originally referring to rough cloth for ordinary wear. Developed a sense of rude c.1500 and obscene by 1711. Perhaps related …   Etymology dictionary

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