fright

\ \ [OE] Prehistoric Germanic *furkhtaz, an adjective of unknown origin (not related to English fear), meant ‘afraid’. From it was derived a noun *furkhtīn, which was the basis of one of the main words for ‘fear’ among the ancient Germanic languages (not superseded as the chief English term by fear until the 13th century). Its modern descendants include German furcht and English fright (in which the original sequence ‘vowel plus r’ was reversed by the process known as metathesis – something which also happened to Middle Low German vruchte, from which Swedish fruktan and Danish frygtfear’ were borrowed).

Word origins - 2ed. . 2005.

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  • fright — [fraıt] n [: Old English; Origin: fyrhto] 1.) [singular, U] a sudden feeling of fear ▪ You gave me such a fright creeping up on me like that! get/have a fright ▪ I got an awful fright when I realised how much money I owed. with fright ▪ He was… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • fright — [ fraıt ] noun 1. ) count an experience that makes you feel suddenly afraid: SCARE: I got such a fright when Joe burst through the door. Sorry, I didn t mean to give you a fright. a ) uncount a sudden strong feeling of being afraid: FEAR: I… …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • fright — ► NOUN 1) a sudden intense feeling of fear. 2) an experience causing fright; a shock. ● look a fright Cf. ↑look a fright ● take fright Cf. ↑take fright …   English terms dictionary

  • Fright — Fright, v. t. [imp. {Frighted}; p. pr. & vb. n.. {Frighting}.] [OE. frigten to fear, frighten, AS. fyrhtan to frighten, forhtian to fear; akin to OS. forhtian, OHG. furihten, forahtan, G. f[ u]rchten, Sw. frukta, Dan. frygte, Goth. faurhtjan. See …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • fright´en|er — fright|en «FRY tuhn», transitive verb. 1. to fill with fright; make afraid; scare or terrify: »Thunder and lightning frighten most children and many adults. 2. to drive or force by terrifying: »The sudden noise frightened the deer away. –v.i. to… …   Useful english dictionary

  • fright|en — «FRY tuhn», transitive verb. 1. to fill with fright; make afraid; scare or terrify: »Thunder and lightning frighten most children and many adults. 2. to drive or force by terrifying: »The sudden noise frightened the deer away. –v.i. to become… …   Useful english dictionary

  • Fright — is a state of extreme fear of something that is strange, ugly or shocking. It may also refer to:*Fright (comics), a comic book villainess * Fright (film), a 1971 slasher film …   Wikipedia

  • Fright — (fr[imac]t), n. [OE. frigt, freyht, AS. fyrhto, fyrhtu; akin to OS. forhta, OHG. forhta, forahta, G. furcht, Dan. frygt, Sw. fruktan, Goth. fa[ u]rhtei fear, fa[ u]rhts timid.] [1913 Webster] 1. A state of terror excited by the sudden appearance… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • fright — n alarm, consternation, panic, *fear, dread, dismay, terror, horror, trepidation Analogous words: scaring or scare, startling, affrighting, frightening (see corresponding verbs at FRIGHTEN): appalling, horrifying, daunting (see DISMAY vb) fright… …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • fright — [n1] extreme apprehension alarm, cold sweat*, consternation, dismay, dread, fear, horror, panic, quaking, scare, shiver, shock, terror, trepidation, trepidity; concept 410 Ant. fearlessness fright [n2] horrifying or unpleasant sight bother,… …   New thesaurus

  • fright — I noun affright, agitation, alarm, anxiety, apprehension, consternation, cowardice, dismay, disquietude, dread, extreme fear, fear, fear of danger, horror, intimidation, misgiving, panic, pavor, phobia, scare, sudden terror, terror, trepidation… …   Law dictionary

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