improvise

\ \ [19] Etymologically, if you improvise something, it is because it has not been ‘provided’ for in advance. The word comes via French improviser from the Italian adjective improvvisoextempore’, a descendant of Latin imprōvīsusunforeseen’. This in turn was formed from the negative prefix in- and the past participle of prōvīdereforesee’ (source of English provide). The earliest recorded use of the verb in English is by Benjamin Disraeli in Vivian Grey 1826: ‘He possessed also the singular faculty of being able to improvise quotations’. (The closely related improvidentnot providing for the future’ [16] preserves even more closely the sense of its Latin original.)
\ \ Cf.PROVIDE

Word origins - 2ed. . 2005.

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  • improvise — [im′prə vīz΄] vt., vi. improvised, improvising [Fr improviser < It improvvisare < improvviso, unprepared < L improvisus, unforeseen < in , not + provisus, pp. of providere, to foresee, anticipate: see PROVIDE] 1. to compose, or… …   English World dictionary

  • Improvise — Im pro*vise , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Improvised}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Improvising}.] [F. improviser, it. improvvisare, fr. improvviso unprovided, sudden, extempore, L. improvisus; pref. im not + provisus foreseen, provided. See {Proviso}.] 1. To… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Improvise — Im pro*vise , v. i. To produce or render extemporaneous compositions, especially in verse or in music, without previous preparation; hence, to do anything offhand. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • improvise — index compose, conjure, contrive, create, devise (invent), invent (produce for the first time), make, originate …   Law dictionary

  • improvisé — improvisé, ée (in pro vi zé, zée) part. passé d improviser. Chanson improvisée. Fête improvisée …   Dictionnaire de la Langue Française d'Émile Littré

  • improvise — (v.) 1826, back formation from improvisation, or else from Fr. improviser (17c.), from It. improvisare to sing or speak extempore, from improviso, from L. improvisus unforeseen, unexpected (see IMPROVISATION (Cf. improvisation)). Or possibly a… …   Etymology dictionary

  • improvise — is spelt ise, not ize …   Modern English usage

  • improvise — [v] make up ad lib, brainstorm, coin, concoct, contrive, dash off*, devise, do offhand, do off top of head*, dream up, extemporize, fake, fake it, improv*, improvisate, invent, jam*, knock off*, make do*, slapdash*, spark, speak off the cuff*,… …   New thesaurus

  • improvise — ► VERB 1) create and perform (music, drama, or verse) spontaneously or without preparation. 2) make from whatever is available. DERIVATIVES improvisation noun improvisational adjective improvisatory adjective improviser noun. ORIGIN …   English terms dictionary

  • improvise — [[t]ɪ̱mprəvaɪz[/t]] improvises, improvising, improvised 1) VERB If you improvise, you make or do something using whatever you have or without having planned it in advance. You need a wok with a steaming rack for this; if you don t have one,… …   English dictionary

  • improvise — UK [ˈɪmprəvaɪz] / US [ˈɪmprəˌvaɪz] verb Word forms improvise : present tense I/you/we/they improvise he/she/it improvises present participle improvising past tense improvised past participle improvised 1) a) [intransitive] to do something without …   English dictionary

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